Fergusons Ceylon

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  • Guild of Fine Foods Gold Winner 2012_Chateau Rouge Ferguson Gold Luxury Ceylon Black Tea

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1 reviews for Fergusons Ceylon

A medium body tea that is just perfect for me as I’m always on the lookout for black teas that taste good without milk

I’ve got to say, the altitude from the Low lying Ratnapura District has definitely affected the taste of Chateau Rouge’s loose leaf Ceylon tea - but in a totally brilliant way of course! So good in fact, that they haven’t confused the delicate flavour with another by mixing it into a tea blend by the time it reaches us!

Posted by Tea Street Blog 17/06/2013

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Fergusons Ceylon

Black Tea

Low lying Ratnapura District, Southern Sri Lanka

Classic black tea from the beautiful island of Sri Lanka, in colonial times known as Ceylon and still used to describe the teas. Inspired by Ferguson's journal a documented history of the island (originally published in 1859), we have searched far and wide across the island to bring you the best Ceylon black tea. Ceylon tea is bright and lively, medium body and delightfully tangy, best drunk balck and perfect for afternoon tea.


"If you are cold, tea will warm you. If you are too heated, it will cool you. If you are depressed, it will cheer you. If you are excited, it will calm you."
Gladstone, 1865

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Price From: £3.95

Availability: In stock

Winner Great Taste Awards Gold 2012 - 'Bright, delicate. Some molasses and caramel coming through.'

 

Sri Lanka’s low-grown teas are normally of lower quality, produced in the tropical heat and humidity, the teas become dark and unremarkable. There is however a handful of producers that have succeeded in keeping the tips white, and now become famous for silver tippy teas. With small leaves like most Broken Orange Pekoe teas, yet flowery with the most unlikely of black tea components silver tips. Ordinarily, tea tips turn golden yellow during black tea production but this tea preserves the tips’ silver hue.

 

This is definitely not a tea to be blended and like Assam is proving how delicious and different the regions teas can be!

 

Using a heaped teaspoon (3 grams) of tea and 2 infusions per serving:

100 grams

 will make approximately

 70 cups of tea

50 grams

 will make approximately

 35 cups of tea

10 grams

 will make approximately

 7 cups of tea

 

 

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